Curriculum Information by Subject

Reading
We want our children to become enthusiastic and engaged readers, and to develop a life-long love of books. We introduce the children to a range of good quality fiction, non-fiction and poetry books through our whole-class, core-text approach to teaching reading, and during their weekly guided reading session.

In the early stages of reading, we teach children to decode words using phonic skills as their main approach, alongside which we teach sight vocabulary. Once grasped, the focus for developing reading is understanding and comprehension. Your child will read with their class teacher once a week during their guided reading session, then independently supported by teacher set activities during the rest of the week.

Home Reading and Reading for Pleasure
Developing readers will bring home levelled books and a picture book each week. Independent readers will bring home self-selected books from their book corner. Please spend time reading with and talking to your child about what they read, and help them to use their reading log to record their enjoyment of reading. Pupils can earn bookmarks for using their reading logs effectively.

Phonics
Phonics is taught daily to all children in Nursery, Reception and Key Stage One. We use the Sounds Write programme to teach children the letters of the alphabet and their matching sounds.

The children are taught to read words by blending, which means saying each sound and then pushing all the sounds together to make a word. The children are taught to spell words by segmenting, which means sounding out words and writing down the sounds they can hear.

By the end of Reception children are expected to know all Phase Three sounds. By the end of Year One all children are expected to know all Phase Five sounds. By the time they have finished Key Stage One, most children are secure in Phase Six sounds. This phase moves away from learning sounds and focuses on spelling rules and patterns.

At the end of Year One all the children in the country take a test called a Phonics Screening. They have to read 40 real and nonsense words. We call the nonsense words ‘Alien words’ and the children practise reading them every day.

Spelling
Alongside phonics, we also teach the children how to spell from Year 1 onwards. We believe that learning to spell is an important tool for your child to use as an essential part of day-to-day life, as well as in their learning. We teach spelling using an investigative and collaborative approach, focusing on spelling patterns, prefixes and suffixes, knowledge of word origin and root words. At the end of Year Two, children will have a spelling test and also at the end of Year Six.

Writing
We use a core text approach over a half term to plan quality written outcomes. This high quality literature is used to engage and inspire the pupils, and provide rich models of writing for them to imitate in their own independent writing, through style, voice and language structure.

The beginning of the half term is spent on the first stage of the writing process – inspire, immerse and analyse, with the remainder of the term spent on planning, quality written outcomes, editing then publishing. A week is devoted to producing the final written outcome as the children are not expected to produce a whole written outcome in one lesson, but rather build up to it over time. Children use cursive handwriting to publish their learning.

Grammar and Punctuation
Grammar and punctuation are taught during English sessions through contextualised learning linked to the core-text. Grammar, language and punctuation skills are taught through analysis of the author’s use of effective vocabulary choices, language structures and writing style, and by using the core-text as a model during the writing process. Children are given opportunities to imitate the author’s style, reflect on why the writing is effective, then to practise and develop their own writing style using the skills they have learnt.

Handwriting
Continuous cursive script is taught from Year 1 onwards through daily handwriting sessions. In Nursery and Reception, pre-cursive script is taught. All handwriting sessions are planned for, modelled and taught following the: I do, we do, you do sequence. Attention is drawn to capitalisation and spelling during the session, as well as to the correct starting point, letter formation and join.

See our Long Term Plans
 Writing: Year 1 | Year 2 | Year 3 | Year 4 | Year 5 | Year 6

 Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar: Year 1 | Year 2 | Year 3 | Year 4 | Year 5 | Year 6

We aim to ensure that all children develop a deep understanding of mathematics.

The national curriculum for mathematics aims to ensure that all pupils:

Become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately

We understand the importance of children knowing more than isolated facts, methods, and the ability to recall facts and times tables. We ensure that children have a full understanding of mathematical concepts, methods, and relationships between the different areas of Maths, such as addition, subtraction, division and multiplication.

It is important that children can recall key facts in Maths, as this will allow them to more efficiently solve problems.

We ensure that children can explain the ‘hows’ and ‘whys’ of Maths. Through reasoning and higher order questioning, children are able to generalise and justify their thinking.

Teachers promote reasoning during Maths lessons, through using carefully chosen questions

e.g.:

_____ thinks that, ______. Do you agree? Explain your answer.

Is it always true, sometimes true or never true that________?

Can you spot the mistake? Explain why they are wrong.

Children are provided with opportunities to express their mathematical reasoning through the use of speech bubbles, through the recap at the beginning of a session, and by addressing misconceptions and in plenaries.

We believe that an integral part of Maths is being able to solve problems. We ensure that real life problem-solving activities are planned into weekly Maths learning. Each child takes part in a weekly problem-solving investigation linked specifically to a problem-solving skill or strategy or, linked to the area of learning for that week. We also plan for mathematical activities to have a problem-solving element throughout the use of daily challenges.

 Download our Long Term Plans for Maths in each Year Group:
Foundation | Year 1 | Year 2 | Year 3 | Year 4 | Year 5 | Year 6

The National Curriculum for Science in Year 1.

Working Scientifically

During years 1 and 2, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • asking simple questions and recognising that they can be answered in different ways
  • observing closely, using simple equipment
  • performing simple tests
  • identifying and classifying
  • using their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions
  • gathering and recording data to help in answering questions.

Plants

Our children will be taught to:

  • identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees
  • identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants, including trees

Animals including humans

Our children will be taught to:

  • identify and name a variety of common animals including, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals
  • identify and name a variety of common animals that are carnivores, herbivores and omnivores
  • describe and compare the structure of a variety of common animals (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals including pets)
  • identify, name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body and say which part of the body is associated with each sense.

Everyday materials

Our children will be taught to:

  • distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made
  • identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass, metal, water, and rock
  • describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials
  • compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties

Seasonal Changes

Our children will be taught to:

  • observe changes across the 4 seasons
  • observe and describe weather associated with the seasons and how day length varies.

The National Curriculum for Science in Year 2.

Working Scientifically

During years 1 and  2, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • asking simple questions and recognising that they can be answered in different ways
  • observing closely, using simple equipment
  • performing simple tests
  • identifying and classifying
  • using their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions
  • gathering and recording data to help in answering questions.

Living things and their habitats

  • explore and compare the differences between things that are living, dead, and things that have never been alive
  • identify that most living things live in habitats to which they are suited and describe how different habitats provide for the basic needs of different kinds of animals and plants, and how they depend on each other
  • identify and name a variety of plants and animals in their habitats, including microhabitats
  • describe how animals obtain their food from plants and other animals, using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food.

Plants

  • observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants
  • find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy.

Animals including humans

  • notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults
  • find out about and describe the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival (water, food and air)
  • describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene.

Uses of everyday materials

  • identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for different uses
  • compare how things move on different surfaces.
  • find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching

The National Curriculum for Science in Year 3.

Working Scientifically

During years 3 and 4, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them
  • setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests
  • making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers
  • gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions
  • recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables
  • reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions
  • using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions
  • identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes
  • using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings.

Plants

  • identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowers
  • explore the requirements of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant
  • investigate the way in which water is transported within plants
  • explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.

Animals including humans

  • identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat
  • identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.

Rocks

  • compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties
  • describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within rock
  • recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter.

Light

  • recognise that they need light in order to see things and that dark is the absence of light
  • notice that light is reflected from surfaces
  • recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes
  • recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by a solid object
  • find patterns in the way that the size of shadows change.

Forces and Magnets

  • compare how things move on different surfaces
  • notice that some forces need contact between 2 objects, but magnetic forces can act at a distance
  • observe how magnets attract or repel each other and attract some materials and not others
  • compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of whether they are attracted to a magnet, and identify some magnetic materials
  • describe magnets as having 2 poles
  • predict whether 2 magnets will attract or repel each other, depending on which poles are facing.

The National Curriculum for Science in Year 4.

Working Scientifically

During years 3 and 4, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them
  • setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests
  • making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers
  • gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions
  • recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables
  • reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions
  • using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions
  • identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes
  • using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings.

All Living Things

Our children will be taught to:

  • recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways
  • explore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment
  • recognise that environments can change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to living things.

Animals including humans

Our children will be taught to:

  • describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans
  • identify the different types of teeth in humans and their simple functions
  • construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey.

States of Matter

Our children will be taught to:

  • compare and group materials together, according to whether they are solids, liquids or gases
  • observe that some materials change state when they are heated or cooled, and measure or research the temperature at which this happens in degrees Celsius (°C)
  • identify the part played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle and associate the rate of evaporation with temperature.

Sound

Our children will be taught to:

  • identify how sounds are made, associating some of them with something vibrating
  • recognise that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the ear
  • find patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produced it
  • find patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it
  • recognise that sounds get fainter as the distance from the sound source increases.

Electricity

Our children will be taught to:

  • identify common appliances that run on electricity
  • construct a simple series electrical circuit, identifying and naming its basic parts, including cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzers
  • identify whether or not a lamp will light in a simple series circuit, based on whether or not the lamp is part of a complete loop with a battery
  • recognise that a switch opens and closes a circuit and associate this with whether or not a lamp lights in a simple series circuit
  • recognise some common conductors and insulators, and associate metals with being good conductors.

The National Curriculum for Science in Year 5.

Working Scientifically

During years 5 and 6, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary
  • taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision
  • recording data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, and bar and line graphs
  • using test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests
  • reporting and presenting findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations
  • identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.

Living Things and their habitats

Our children will be taught to:

  • describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird
  • describe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animals.

Animals, including humans

Our children will be taught to:

  • describe the changes as humans develop to old age.

Properties and Changes of Materials

Our children will be taught to:

  • compare and group together everyday materials on the basis of their properties, including their hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal), and response to magnets
  • know that some materials will dissolve in liquid to form a solution, and describe how to recover a substance from a solution
  • use knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated, including through filtering, sieving and evaporating
  • give reasons, based on evidence from comparative and fair tests, for the particular uses of everyday materials, including metals, wood and plastic
  • demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes
  • explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning and the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda.

Earth and Space

Our children will be taught to:

  • describe the movement of the Earth, and other planets, relative to the Sun in the solar system
  • describe the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth
  • describe the Sun, Earth and Moon as approximately spherical bodies
  • use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night, and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky.

Forces

Our children will be taught to:

  • explain that unsupported objects fall towards the Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object
  • identify the effects of air resistance, water resistance and friction, that act between moving surfaces
  • recognise that some mechanisms including levers, pulleys and gears allow a smaller force to have a greater effect

The National Curriculum for Science in Year 6.

Working Scientifically

During years 5 and 6, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary
  • taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision
  • recording data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, and bar and line graphs
  • using test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests
  • using simple models to describe scientific ideas
  • reporting and presenting findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations
  • identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.

Living Things and their habitats

  • describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animals
  • give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics.

Animals including humans

  • identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system, and describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood
  • recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function
  • describe the ways in which nutrients and water are transported within animals, including humans.

Evolution

  • recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago
  • recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents
  • identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution.

Light

  • recognise that light appears to travel in straight lines
  • use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eye
  • explain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or from light sources to objects and then to our eyes
  • use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them

Electricity

  • associate the brightness of a lamp or the volume of a buzzer with the number and voltage of cells used in the circuit
  • compare and give reasons for variations in how components function, including the brightness of bulbs, the loudness of buzzers and the on/off position of switches
  • use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit in a diagram.

 Click here to view our Long Term Plan for Science

Art and Design enriches children’s learning and enables them to communicate their thoughts, ideas and observations in a practical and expressive way. It embodies some of the highest forms of human creativity. We are dedicated, as a school, to provide a rich and inspiring curriculum which fosters an open-ended exploration of creativity. Basic skills are introduced and then built on throughout school.

The National Curriculum for Art and Design, states that children should be able to:

  • experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design.

  • think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design.

  • know how art and design reflect and shape our history and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation.

Art and Design in EYFS

Expressive Arts and Design (EAD) in Early Years enables children to explore and play with a range of media and materials and provides opportunities and encouragement for sharing thoughts, ideas and feelings through a variety of art, music, movement, dance, role-play and design and technology. it is broken down into:

  • Exploring and using media and materials: children safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.
  • Being imaginative: children use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways which represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings.

Art and Design in KS1

Pupils should be taught:

  • to use a range of materials creatively and design and make products.
  • to use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination.
  • to develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.
  • about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between the practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.

Art and Design in KS2

Pupils should be taught to develop their techniques, including their control and use of materials, with creativity, experimentation and an increasing awareness of different kinds of art, craft and design.

Pupils should be taught to:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials (for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay).
  • about great artists, architects and designers in history.

 Click here to view our Long Term Plan for Art

The National Curriculum for Computing in Years 1 and 2.

Our children will be taught to:

  • understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions
  • create and debug simple programs
  • use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs
  • use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content
  • recognise common uses of information technology beyond school
  • use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about material on the internet or other online technologies

The National Curriculum for Computing in Years 3 to 6.

Our children will be taught to:

  • design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts
  • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output
  • use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  • understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world-wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration
  • use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content
  • select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information.
  • use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact

 Click here to view our Long Term Plan for Computing

In design and technology our vision is to empower children through equipping them with the opportunity to develop key life skills.

  • Development of creativity, imagination, co-operation and communication skills.
  • Practical life skills including team work, critical thinking and problem solving.
  • Development of Understanding when using technology to help plan and design.
  • Development of understanding needs in relation to people and the environment when working from a brief.
  • Skills which children can use to mould, craft and make projects using a wide range of materials.
  • Skills which the children can take into future employment.

Design and Technology in EYFS

Children will learn about the world around them. Exploring different mechanisms such as how bikes and scooters move. They will also learn about different materials some of their basic properties and   begin to investigate simple structures and how to make them.  Children will be given the opportunity to experience a range of different food, discussing taste, textures and smells.

Design and Technology in KS1

Children will develop knowledge of how wheels and axels work as well as simple sliders and levers. They will learn about freestanding structures and how to make them stable. They will begin to learn simple sewing techniques as well as how to prepare simple dishes.

Design and Technology in KS2

Children will build upon the skills they have been learning through school. They will develop their knowledge of mechanisms and structures in line with the national curriculum framework. They will begin to shape material from 2D to 3D and combine different fabric shapes. They will develop their understanding of healthy food and explore cultural and celebrations in relation to food. During KS2 children will also being to learn about electronics and electrical systems.

By providing the children with exciting and inspiring practical projects they will be able to use their imagination, creativity and team work to create innovative products which have been meticulously planned and evaluated. Cross curricular links will provide the children with the opportunity to master maths, science and ICT skills learnt throughout their learning journey through school.  By evaluating current designs, products and materials children will learn about sustainability on a range of different scales including home, school and the wider environment and the impact that they can have upon these.

 Click here to view our Long Term Plan for Design Technology

At The Florence Nightingale Academy we are very lucky to learn not one but two languages.  We study Spanish and have weekly lessons with our Mandarin and Chinese Culture Teacher Mrs Jin from F2 to Year 6.

The National Curriculum for Foreign Languages in Years 3 to 6.

Note that the curriculum aims state that: Teaching may be of any modern or ancient foreign language and should focus on enabling pupils to make substantial progress in one language.

Listening & Comprehension

Our children will be taught to:

  • listen attentively to spoken language and show understanding by joining in and responding
  • explore the patterns and sounds of language through songs and rhymes and link the spelling, sound and meaning of words

Speaking

Our children will be taught to:

  • engage in conversations; ask and answer questions; express opinions and respond to those of others; seek clarification and help*
  • speak in sentences, using familiar vocabulary, phrases and basic language structures
  • develop accurate pronunciation and intonation so that others understand when they are reading aloud or using familiar words and phrases*
  • present ideas and information orally to a range of audiences*

Reading & Comprehension

Our children will be taught to:

  • read carefully and show understanding of words, phrases and simple writing
  • appreciate stories, songs, poems and rhymes in the language
  • broaden their vocabulary and develop their ability to understand new words that are introduced into familiar written material, including through using a dictionary

Writing

Our children will be taught to:

  • write phrases from memory, and adapt these to create new sentences, to express ideas clearly
  • describe people, places, things and actions orally* and in writing
  • understand basic grammar appropriate to the language being studied, including (where relevant): feminine, masculine and neuter forms and the conjugation of high-frequency verbs; key features and patterns of the language; how to apply these, for instance, to build sentences; and how these differ from or are similar to English.

(*Not ancient languages)

 Click here to view our Long Term Plan for Mandarin

 Click here to view our Long Term Plan for Spanish

The National Curriculum for Geography in Years 1 and 2.

Location Knowledge

Our children will be taught to:

  • name and locate the world’s 7 continents and 5 oceans
  • name, locate and identify characteristics of the 4 countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas

Place Knowledge

Our children will be taught to:

  • understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the United Kingdom, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country

Human and Physical Geography

Our children will be taught to:

  • identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles
  • use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to:
    • key physical features, including: beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather
    • key human features, including: city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop

Geographical Skills and Fieldwork

Our children will be taught to:

  • use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage
  • use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language [for example, near and far; left and right], to describe the location of features and routes on a map
  • use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key
  • use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.

The National Curriculum for Geography in Years 3 to 6.

Locational Knowledge

Our children will be taught to:

  • locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities
  • name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time
  • identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)

Place Knowledge

Our children will be taught to:

  • understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region in North or South America

Human and Physical Geography

Our children will be taught to:

  • describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle
  • describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water

Geographical Skills and Fieldwork

Our children will be taught to:

  • use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied
  • use the 8 points of a compass, 4 and 6-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world
  • use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

 Click here to view our Long Term Plan for Humanities

At Florence Nightingale we are historians! We want our children to love history and for them to have no limits to what their aspirations and ambitions can be. For them to grow up wanting to be archivists, museum curators, archaeologists or research analysts. Through our high-quality history education, we help our children to gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. We want to enhance their curiosity and prepare them to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence and develop perspective and judgement. We want our children to remember their history lessons in our school, to cherish these memories and embrace the historical opportunities they are presented with!

 

The National Curriculum for History in Years 1 and 2.

Our children will be taught to:
Examples in italics are not statutory

  • changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life
  • events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally e.g. the Great Fire of London, the first aeroplane flight or events commemorated through festivals or anniversaries
  • the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods e.g. Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria, Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong, William Caxton and Tim Berners-Lee, Pieter Bruegel the Elder and LS Lowry, Rosa Parks and Emily Davison, Mary Seacole and/or Florence Nightingale and Edith Cavell
  • significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.

The National Curriculum for History in Years 3 to 6.

Examples in italics are not statutory.

Pre-Roman Britain

Our children will be taught about changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age

This could include:

  • late Neolithic hunter-gatherers and early farmers, for example, Skara Brae
  • Bronze Age religion, technology and travel, for example, Stonehenge
  • Iron Age hill forts: tribal kingdoms, farming, art and culture

Roman Britain

Our children will be taught about the Roman empire and its impact on Britain

This could include:

  • Julius Caesar’s attempted invasion in 55-54 BC
  • the Roman Empire by AD 42 and the power of its army
  • successful invasion by Claudius and conquest, including Hadrian’s Wall
  • British resistance, for example, Boudica
  • “Romanisation” of Britain: sites such as Caerwent and the impact of technology, culture and beliefs, including early Christianity

Anglo-Saxons & Scots

Our children will be taught about Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots

This could include:

  • Roman withdrawal from Britain in c. AD 410 and the fall of the western Roman Empire
  • Scots invasions from Ireland to north Britain (now Scotland)
  • Anglo-Saxon invasions, settlements and kingdoms: place names and village life
  • Anglo-Saxon art and culture
  • Christian conversion – Canterbury, Iona and Lindisfarne

Anglo-Saxons & Vikings

Our children will be taught about the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor

This could include:

  • Viking raids and invasion
  • resistance by Alfred the Great and Athelstan, first king of England
  • further Viking invasions and Danegeld
  • Anglo-Saxon laws and justice
  • Edward the Confessor and his death in 1066

Local History

Our children will be taught about an aspect of local history

For example:

  • a depth study linked to one of the British areas of study listed above
  • a study over time tracing how several aspects of national history are reflected in the locality (this can go beyond 1066)
  • a study of an aspect of history or a site dating from a period beyond 1066 that is significant in the locality.

Extended chronological study

Our children will be taught a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066

For example:

  • the changing power of monarchs using case studies such as John, Anne and Victoria
  • changes in an aspect of social history, such as crime and punishment from the Anglo-Saxons to the present or leisure and entertainment in the 20th Century
  • the legacy of Greek or Roman culture (art, architecture or literature) on later periods in British history, including the present day
  • a significant turning point in British history, for example, the first railways or the Battle of Britain

Ancient Civilizations

Our children will be taught about the achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of one of the following:

  • Ancient Sumer;
  • The Indus Valley;
  • Ancient Egypt; or
  • The Shang Dynasty of Ancient China

Ancient Greece

Our children will be taught a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world

Non-European Study

Our children will be taught about a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history – one study chosen from:

  • early Islamic civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900;
  • Mayan civilization c. AD 900; or
  • Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300

 Click here to view our Long Term Plan for Humanities

Each year group studies different instruments and mediums for making music.

  • Year 1 – Singing and rhythm
  • Year 2 – Recorders
  • Year 3 – Understanding of classical music
  • Year 4 – Ukuleles
  • Year 5 – Ukuleles
  • Year 6 – Guitar

We have weekly singing assemblies with an outside musician and an active school choir who perform in school and for the local community.  Our Year 5 and 6 children perform annually with the Hallé Orchestra at the Royal Concert Hall in Nottingham.   We also have a very popular after school recorders club.

The National Curriculum for Music in Years 1 and 2.

Our children will be taught to:

  • use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes
  • play tuned and untuned instruments musically
  • listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music
  • experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the interrelated dimensions of music

The National Curriculum for Music in Years 3 to 6.

Our children will be taught to:

  • play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression
  • improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the interrelated dimensions of music
  • listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory
  • use and understand staff and other musical notations
  • appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians
  • develop an understanding of the history of music.

 Click here to view our Long Term Plan for Music

PE lessons are led by our PE specialist Mrs Chauhan.

We have a wide and varied curriculum covering different types of sports and activities:

  • Games (Invasion, net and wall, target games, striking & Fielding) such as netball, football, rugby, tennis, handball and tchoukball.
  • Gymnastics including parkour and sports acrobatics.
  • Athletics both indoors and outdoors.
  • Dance – Children take part in a range of different dance genres such as Chinese New Year Dragon Dance, breakdancing and Blue Planet  Year 1 have weekly ballet lessons with a specialist dance teacher.
  • Health and Fitness including skipping, circuit training, Zumba, boxericse, yoga among others.
  • Swimming – Year 3 and 5 both attend swimming lessons at Victoria Park Leisure Centre in Ilkeston.
  • Commando Joe’s – Each class has a weekly Commando Joe’s lesson which develops the R.E.S.P.E.C.T skills and OAA activities.

The National Curriculum for Physical Education in Years 1 and 2:

Sport & Games

Our children will be taught to:

  • master basic movements including running, jumping, throwing and catching, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities
  • participate in team games, developing simple tactics for attacking and defending
  • perform dances using simple movement patterns

The National Curriculum for Physical Education in Years 3 – 6:

Sport & Games

Our children will be taught to:

  • use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination
  • play competitive games [for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis], modified where appropriate, and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending
  • develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance [for example through athletics and gymnastics]
  • perform dances using a range of movement patterns
  • take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team
  • compare their performances with previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best.

Swimming and water safety

Our children will be taught to:

  • All schools must provide swimming instruction either in key stage 1 or key stage 2.
    In particular, pupils should be taught to:
  • swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25 metres
  • use a range of strokes [for example, front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke] effectively
  • perform safe self-rescue in different water-based situations.

In Nursery and F2 children are taught and explore PESD skills:

Fundamental skills in dance & movement, games, ABC (Agility, balance & Coordination) skills.

 Click here to view our Long Term Plan for PE

Through the PSHE and British Values curriculum we aim to prepare our children for life in the wider world.  They will learn about their physical and mental health, how to stay safe online, as well as relationships.

Aims:

As a school we aim to promote PSHE and British Values and to create a safe space for children to openly discuss and share their views and opinions.

Children are taught about the benefits of a healthier lifestyle, what determines their physical health and how to build mental resilience and wellbeing. It will also make sure children and young people learn how to recognise when they and others are struggling with mental health and how to respond. (DfE, 2019)

They are able to take part in discussions about current affairs, key issues and express their thoughts and feelings.  They are taught practical strategies to deal with their emotions, how to improve their physical and mental health and well-being.  They learn about their changing bodies and emotions in preparation for secondary school and adulthood.  It is hoped that we equip them with the information they need to make informed decisions in the future and take responsibility for their own health.

All classes have weekly PSHE lessons with Mrs Chauhan and their class teacher.  We are following the SCARF (Coram Life Education) and the PSHE Curriculum from September 2020.

Each class discusses the weekly PSHE Picture News theme, every class has a worry box, an anti-bullying board and two anti-bullying advocates.

We support and promote National and International days such as Anti-Bullying week, LGBTQ+ Awareness, Disability Awareness, Mental Health day, among others.

 Click here to view our Long Term Plan for PSHE

As a whole school we have agreed to adopt the Nottinghamshire’s Religious Education Agreed Syllabus. The aim of RE in Nottinghamshire is to ensure all pupils:

  • Know about and understand a range of religions and world views.
  • Express ideas and insights about the nature, significance and impact of religions and world views.
  • Gain and deploy the skills needed to engage seriously with religions and world views.

RE in EYFS

  • Pupils should encounter religions and world views through special people, books, times, places and objects and by visiting places of worship.
  • They should listen to and talk about stories.
  • Pupils can be introduced to subject specific words and use all their senses to explore beliefs, practices and forms of expression.
  • They ask questions and reflect on their own feelings and experiences.
  • They use their imagination and curiosity to develop their appreciation of and wonder at the world in which they live.

RE in KS1

  • The Focus of RE for KS1 enables children to develop their knowledge and understanding of religions and world views.
  • They find out about simple examples of religion that are drawn from local, national and global contexts.
  • They should use basic subject specific vocabulary.
  • They should raise questions and begin to express their own views in response to the material they learn about and in response to questions about their ideas.

RE in KS2

  • The Focus of RE for KS2 enables pupils to extend their knowledge and understanding of religions and world views, recognising their local, national and global contexts.
  • They should be introduced to an extended range of sources and subject specific vocabulary.
  • They should be encouraged to be curious and to ask increasingly challenging questions about religion, belief, values and human life.
  • Pupils should learn to express their own ideas in response to the material they engage with, identifying relevant information, selecting examples and giving reasons to support their ideas and views

 Click here to view our Long Term Plan for RE

Assessment

Why assess?

Children’s progress is closely monitored in order that we can provide the best possible opportunities and highest levels of support for all children.  All assessment activities aim to ensure that the children are able to make excellent progress in their learning whilst taking into account the needs of individual children.

The aims and objectives of assessment in our school are:

  • to enable our children to demonstrate what they know, understand and can do in their work;
  • to allow teaching teams to plan work that accurately reflects the needs of each child;
  • to help our children understand what they need to do next to improve their work;
  • to provide regular information for parents that enables them to support their child’s learning;
  • to contribute towards accountability data

Our thinking is underpinned by a number of core documents, including the report of the Commission on Assessment Without Levels (DfE, 2015), the Education Endowment foundation research on effective interventions (EEF, 2016) and various articles by experts such as Dylan Wiliam (2015) and others. We are also guided by the expectations of Ofsted, and the School Inspection Handbook (Ofsted, 2015).

In line with the guidance of the Commission on Assessment Without Levels, we consider assessment on three main levels:

  • Day-to-day in-school formative assessment
  • In-school summative assessment
  • Nationally standardised summative assessment

Each of these is considered by this policy, with our processes outlined at each stage. At all stages, we are mindful that reducing teacher workload should be a key aim or our work to ensure that teachers’ time is best used for supporting children to make good progress through effective curriculum design, assessment and feedback.

Day-to-day in-school formative assessment

This section should be read in combination with the school’s Feedback Policy

Formative assessment is at the heart of good assessment practice in our school. In particular, our intention is that formative assessment follows the model proposed by Dylan Wiliam of responsive teachingThat is, assessment should be used to shape teaching and curriculum, as well as to provide formative feedback to pupils.

In accordance with the guidance in the Assessment Without Levels Commission report, we do not intend that teachers record formative assessment, except where it is intended to directly support pupil progress. Most assessment of this type will happen informally in the classroom through approaches which are recognised in our feedback policy.

The main driver of assessment for teachers, will be via our Key Performance Indicator (KPI) tracker. We have created these by pulling out the ‘Big Ideas’ from each Programme of Study in Maths, Writing and Reading thus developing an assessment framework that assesses the depth of understanding and ensures progression year on year. These trackers can be found at the front of each child’s book.

Throughout the year, all teachers have access to the School Pupil Tracker software which allows them to track pupils’ understanding of concepts and process taught through the use of our Key Performance Indicators model, and to identify any gaps in provision. Our Senior Leadership Team (SLT) have access to whole school data, and team and subject leaders make use of this tracking information to evaluate provision in each team.

The main focus of our KPI trackers and School Pupil Tracker is to support teachers in making decisions about actions and interventions in the classroom. This is particularly closely linked to our mastery-approach curriculum, and allows teachers to identify expected attainment against specific objectives, and quickly to identify where individuals or groups of pupils are falling behind. This can lead to rapid intervention and support to close the gap – or in many cases to prevent the gaps from forming.

Each Programme of Study has been divided into learning steps based on the amount of KPIs that a child achieves. There are 3 learning steps for each year, these are: Low, Mid and High. For those children who are working in greater depth a # will be applied.

More able children

Rather than moving onto the next year’s curriculum, the focus for these children will be on ‘mastering’ their knowledge through the application of skills in different contexts – they will be deepening their learning.

The depth and application of a child’s learning is an important marker of their achievement and progress.

In-school summative assessment

We agree with the view of the Commission on Assessment Without Levels that “recording summative data more frequently than three times a year is not likely to provide useful information”. Wherever possible, the intention is that teachers’ time should be available to make use of feedback in all its forms to ensure that pupils are challenged appropriately, provided with a broad, balanced and well-targeted curriculum, supported to make good progress, and provided with guidance for further improvement.

To support senior leaders’ understanding of attainment across the school, and to identify any specific gaps in learning for groups of pupils, including those vulnerable groups, we make use of summative assessment judgements 3 times a each year. This data is collected from class teachers as efficiently as possible, and is analysed by senior leaders to provide insights into attainment and progress across the school.

To support our summative judgements, we use a number of approaches:

  • Each term, data is collated from teachers’ on-going judgements using our KPIs on the SPT software using the in-built reports to ascertain the percentage of objectives taught and secured by pupils in each year group.
  • Once each term, GL Assessments in the core subjects are used in each year group to provide a snapshot of pupils’ attainment in each of English, Maths and Science.
  • Once each term, teachers will complete our KPI sheets in the front of each book indicating which have been met and setting the child a clear target..
  • Using the combination of test, SPT data and books, teachers make a single summative judgement about pupils’ attainment indicating whether they are a low, mid or high.

It is typically expected that most children will move from low, to mid and finally to high by the end of the Summer term.  Yearly progress is measured from the judgement awarded in the previous Summer term. Therefore, expected progress for any pupil graded as secure is three steps

Any pupil not on target for ARE is targeted to make accelerated progress  (4 steps) in order to complete the following year as High.

The data from final teacher assessments is collated by school leaders to monitor and evaluate progress and attainment of pupils in all year groups. This includes comparisons between cohorts, pupils of different genders, those with special educational needs, and disadvantaged pupils. These judgements allow leaders to identify any significant gaps in progress or attainment for significant groups of pupils, and to support robust challenge as part of our wider school monitoring processes. This monitoring is also used by school leaders to verify the accuracy of teacher assessment judgments against the framework.

Early Years – Nursery & Reception

Children in Nursery and Reception will continue to be assessed against the Prime and Specific areas of Learning in the EYFS profile.

Assessments will be based on observation of daily activities and events. At the end of Reception for each Early Learning Goal, teachers will judge whether a child is meeting the level of development expected at the end of the Reception year:

Emerging, not yet reached the expected level of development

Expected

Exceeding, beyond the expected level of development for their age

Nationally standardised summative assessment

Nationally standardised assessments are used at the end of Foundation Stage (until 2016), Key Stages 1 and 2, along with the Phonics Check in Year 1, as part of statutory accountability procedures. Assessments are carried out in line with the processes set out in the DfE guidance in Assessment and Reporting Arrangement documents each year.

School leaders make use of the results of these tests and assessments, through internal scrutiny, local authority evaluation and as part of Raise Online, to identify areas of strength and improvement as part of whole-school development planning. Where appropriate, these results may also lead to actions being taken to support relevant cohorts who remain in the school (i.e. other than at Key Stage 2).

During relevant years (i.e. Y1, Y2 and Y6), teachers make use of past test papers, or sample papers, to provide children with an opportunity to experience the assessment process. The results of these tests are also used to support identification of pupils who may need additional support to reach targeted outcomes.

Targets

Each term every child is given a learning step for: Reading, Wring, Maths and based on the amount of KPIs achieved.  Each child has a pupil tracker, where they record their achievement of each KPI. This is then shared with parents during consultation evenings.

 Reporting to Parents

Discussions at parent, teacher, consultation meetings in the Autumn and Spring terms will be based on whether their child is on track to be at the age expected level by the end of the year. The Summer term written report will explain whether or not the child has reached age-expected expectation and will detail the Key Objectives achieved or needed to reach age-expected. It will also state whether a child is:

Working towards the age-related expectation

At the expected level

Exceeding the expected level

We offer a range of after school clubs and teams led predominantly by school staff. 

All staff in school are keen to expose children to a wide range of opportunities and to help develop their understanding and skills of the wider world.

Many children go on to represent the school in sporting and other opportunities.

We take part in many local competitions and are members of the Eastwood and District Sports Association and Broxtowe School Games partnership.

We also have good links with local sports clubs:

  • Eastwood Community Football Club
  • Eastwood Cricket Club 
  • Kimberley & District Striders Running Club
  • Alix Johnson School of Dance 
  • Commando Joe’s